Virginia Tech Shooting

Virginia Tech Shooting

On April 16, 2007, 32 people died after being gunned down on the campus of Virginia Tech by Seung-Hui Cho, a student at the college who later died by suicide.

The Virginia Tech shooting began around 7:15 a.m., when Cho, a 23-year-old senior and English major at Blacksburg-based Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, shot a female freshman and a male resident assistant in a campus dormitory before fleeing the building.

Police were soon on the scene; unaware of the gunman’s identity, they initially pursued the female victim’s boyfriend as a suspect in what they believed to be an isolated domestic-violence incident.

However, at around 9:40 a.m., Cho, armed with a 9-millimeter handgun, a 22-caliber handgun and hundreds of rounds of ammunition, entered a classroom building, chained and locked several main doors and went from room to room shooting people. Approximately 10 minutes after the rampage began, he died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

The attack left 32 people dead and more than a dozen wounded. In all, 27 students and five faculty members died in the massacre.

Two days later, on April 18, NBC News received a package of materials from Cho with a timestamp indicating he had mailed it from a Virginia post office between the first and second shooting attacks. Contained in the package were photos of a gun-wielding Cho, along with a rambling video diatribe in which he ranted about wealthy “brats,” among other topics.

In the aftermath of the Virginia Tech shooting, authorities found no evidence that Cho, who was born in South Korea and moved to America with his family in 1992, had specifically targeted any of his victims. The public soon learned that Cho, described by students as a loner who rarely spoke to anyone, had a history of mental health problems.

It was also revealed that angry, violent writings Cho made for certain class assignments had raised concern among some of his professors and fellow students well before the events of April 16. In 2011, Virginia Tech was fined by the U.S. Department of Education for failing to issue a prompt campus-wide warning after Cho shot his first two victims.


Virginia Tech Mass shooting

On April 16, 2007, Seung -Hui Cho killed 32 students and wounded 17 at Virginia Polytechnic Insitute. Cho killed himself. It was the deadliest school shooting in US history.

Seung -Hui Cho was born in South Korea. He moved with his family to the United States at the age of eight. In Middle School, he was diagnosed with severe anxiety disorder. Throughout Middle School and High School Cho received therapy and special support.

Cho enrolled at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg Virginia. In 2005 Cho was accused of stalking two female students. After an investigation, he was deemed mentally ill and ordered to undergo mental health treatment. He was not however institutionalized. As a result, he was able to purchase guns.

At 7:15 AM on April 16th, 2007 Cho entered West Ambler Johnston Hall he entered the room of Emily J Hilscher and fatally shot her, he then shot Ryan C Clark who came to her aid. Cho then left the building returned to his dorm deleted items from his computer and mailed a package to NBC news with a manifesto against rich kids in it.

At approximately 9:30 Cho entered Norris Hall. There he went from classroom to classroom randomly shooting students. He continued firing for ten minutes killing five faculty members and an additional twenty-five students before killing himself.

As a result of the shooting, the State of Virginia changed its laws to match national gun control laws when it came to keeping track of mentally ill individuals who wish to buy guns.
The US government passed the first gun control laws in a decade mandating improving state reporting.


Early Life

Born in South Korea on January 18, 1984, Seung-Hui Cho is known for carrying out one of the most devastating mass murders in the United States in 2007. Several years before the shooting, when Cho was about 8 years old, he and his family came to the country from South Korea. They eventually settled in Centreville, Virginia, where they ran a dry-cleaning business. Cho was known as a shy child who liked basketball and did well in math. But according to an article in Newsweek magazine, Cho was also bullied by other children, including wealthy members of his church.

In high school, Cho was described as sullen and aloof. After graduating in 2003, he went on to study at Virginia Tech University. Located in Blacksburg, Virginia, the school has an extensive campus with more than 30,000 students residing there. Cho stood out as a near-silent loner who wrote gruesome poems, stories and plays. He sometimes referred to himself as "Question Mark."


Timeline: How the Virginia Tech Shootings Unfolded

The first shooting occurred at about 7:15 a.m. at West Ambler Johnston, a coed dormitory. The second shooting took place two hours later, at Norris Hall, an engineering building about a half-mile away. Lindsay Mangum, NPR hide caption

The first shooting occurred at about 7:15 a.m. at West Ambler Johnston, a coed dormitory. The second shooting took place two hours later, at Norris Hall, an engineering building about a half-mile away.

The shootings at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va. — the deadliest shooting rampage in U.S. history — left 33 people dead. Police have identified Seung-Hui Cho, a 23-year-old English major from Centerville, Va., as the gunman he was among the dead. The killings began at 7:15 a.m. on April 16 a timeline charts key events in the day's tragedy.

Monday, April 16, 2007

7:15 a.m. -- Virginia Tech police respond to a 911 call from West Ambler Johnston Residence Hall, where a man and woman have been shot and killed. Police establish a safety perimeter around the dorm.

7:30 a.m. -- After interviewing witnesses, police believe the double homicide stemmed from a domestic dispute and was an isolated incident. They also believe the gunman has fled campus and are following up on leads concerning a person of interest in relation to the killings.

8 a.m. -- Students begin their first classes of the day. Word of the killings begins to spread among students via text messages and cell-phone calls.

8:25 a.m. -- Virginia Tech officials, including the university president, executive vice president and provost, meet to assess the situation and decide how to notify staff and students.

9 a.m. -- Campus police Chief Wendell Flinchum briefs university officials on the investigation.

9:26 a.m. -- School officials send out the first e-mail notifying staff and students to the killings at West Ambler Johnston Residence Hall.

Off campus, police interview a person of interest in the first shooting, whom they do not arrest. While they are speaking with him, the second attack starts at Norris Hall.

9:45 a.m. -- The campus police respond to a 911 call about a shooting at Norris Hall, an engineering building, where the front doors have been chained shut from the inside. The police break in and hear gunshots coming from the second floor. When they get upstairs, the gunshots stop, and the officers find the gunman has killed himself.

9:50 a.m. -- Virginia Tech officials send a second e-mail, warning students that a gunman is loose on campus. They ask everyone to stay inside and away from the windows until further notice.

10:16 a.m. -- A third e-mail from university announces that all classes have been canceled. It also advises people on campus to remain behind locked doors and for those who are not on campus to stay away.

10:52 a.m. -- University officials send another e-mail saying that a number of people have been shot inside Norris Hall. They repeat earlier warnings to stay inside.

12 p.m. -- At a news conference, Virginia Tech police Chief Wendell Flinchum says 22 people have been killed.

4:30 p.m. -- University President Charles W. Steger and Flinchum, the campus police chief, confirm that 33 people are dead, including the gunman. They say they will not announce the names of the victims until their families are notified.

Compiled from NPR staff reports, the Virginia Tech web site, press conferences and the Collegiate Times.


2 Dead of Gunshots as Violence Revisits Virginia Tech

BLACKSBURG, Va. — Nearly five years after a massacre at Virginia Tech that was the deadliest ever on a school campus, two men, including a campus police officer, died of gunshot wounds there on Thursday afternoon.

The police officer, Deriek W. Crouse, 39, of Christiansburg, Va., was shot at close range by a man who had walked up to him as he was making a traffic stop in a campus parking lot, the police said.

Officials did not identify the gunman, but in a conference call with reporters on Thursday night, Gov. Bob McDonnell and state police officers said the evidence was strong that he was the second dead man, whose body was found in a parking lot about a quarter-mile away from the traffic stop.

“We have recovered clothing items that would lead us to believe that he would be one and the same,” said Maj. Rick Jenkins, deputy director of the Virginia State Police’s bureau of investigation. But he added, “We are not in a situation to say that definitively at this point.”

The killing of Officer Crouse, an Army veteran with five children, happened around noon and was captured on video by a camera that had been mounted on his car dashboard.

Officials said they believed the gunman had acted alone in killing Officer Crouse.

Capt. George Austin of the state police said the police are still investigating whether the gunman knew Officer Crouse or the person in the car who was stopped. The police said they had been conducting tests of DNA and ballistics at a facility in nearby Roanoke and interviewing witnesses to establish the identity of the gunman.

The shooting dredged up traumatic memories of April 16, 2007, when a student, Seung-Hui Cho, shot and killed 32 people before killing himself on the campus, five hours south of Washington in the western mountains of Virginia.

Image

With that experience still vivid, an emergency notification went out on Thursday within minutes, leading to a universitywide lockdown of students and staff in campus buildings, and hundreds of police officers, some wearing body armor and carrying machine guns, hurrying to respond.

“Our hearts are broken again,” said Charles W. Steger, the president of the university.

Governor McDonnell, whose daughter is a graduate student at Virginia Tech and was in lockdown in a campus basement all day, said, “It was honestly very tragic news to receive this afternoon.”

Several Virginia Tech officials rushed back to campus after spending much of the day in Washington where, by coincidence, the university was appealing a $55,000 fine levied by the Department of Education for waiting too long to notify students after the 2007 attack.

Ed Falco, the director of creative writing at Virginia Tech, was among 12 professors locked in his office at Shanks Hall.

Mr. Falco, who was off campus during the 2007 shooting, said he had been at home on Thursday when he received the alert on the campus message system. He said that because previous alerts had been prompted by backfiring trucks and other false alarms, he decided to go to the campus for an appointment.

“I figured this would be the same thing, and came to campus anyway,” he said from inside his office. “I’m fine, but along with everyone else, this brings back very bad memories and bad associations. That this is actually happening is unbelievable.”

Mr. Falco said that there had been a state trooper parked outside the building throughout the afternoon and that the police had been inside to make sure everyone was fine.

“SWAT team called to us from a door, people were running. It was chaos,” said Hannah Nowack, a freshman. “We were herded into an entry to a room with hands on our heads, they searched us all, it was really scary. Then I realized I was in a safe place.”

The shooting occurred about 12:15 p.m., during what was described as a routine traffic stop in a parking lot near McComas Hall, a gym and sports building.

Afterward, witnesses reported seeing the suspect running toward a different parking lot, called the Cage. That is where the police said they found the second body. They said the man had been alive at first sighting and that responding officers had not shot him. A gun was found near the body, and Major Jenkins said they believed it was the same gun seen in the video that was carried by the gunman. The police did not say whether the man had been a student.

Classes were not in session on Thursday because students were preparing for final exams, but there were still thousands of students, staff and faculty members on campus at the time, officials said.

Hayley Bance, a freshman from Richmond, Va., said she was sitting with some friends in a dining area at the Squires Student Center when the building suddenly became a flurry of police activity.

“It was unreal. It just didn’t feel like it was happening on this campus,” Ms. Bance said. “Then we were told to move away from the windows and were taken upstairs. We saw these two police officers with huge guns. Then it started to feel real.”

Erika Meitner, an assistant professor of English at the university, said her 4-year-old son had been among 45 children on lockdown at a campus day care center, not far from where the shooting occurred. After nervously waiting for several hours, Ms. Meitner said her husband had gone to campus to pick up her son when the center began to release children.

She said that even though the shooting had occurred not far from Wallace Hall, where the day care is located, the children had been unaware that anything was amiss because the gunfire had occurred during their nap time.


Virginia Tech Shooting - HISTORY

The Library of Virginia
800 East Broad Street
Richmond, Virginia 23219-8000
USA
Phone: (804) 692-3888 (Archives Reference)
Fax: (804) 692-3556 (Archives Reference)
Email: [email protected](Archives)
URL: http://www.lva.virginia.gov/

© 2017 By The Library of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Processed by: Roger E. Christman

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

This collection includes health records, legal advice, and personal information that is restricted for 75 years by the Code of Virginia (Virginia Government Data Collection and Dissemination Practices Act, Virginia Public Records Act, and the Virginia Health Records Privacy Act).

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Records of the Virginia Tech Review Panel, [specific series], [dates]. Accession 51144. State Records Collection, The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia.

Acquisition Information

Office of the Governor, Patrick Henry Building, 1111 East Broad Street, Richmond, Virginia, accession 51144 transferred on 9 January 2014.

Gordon Davies papers, accession 52129, gift received on 15 September 2017.

Custodial History

The records of the Virginia Tech Review Panel were compiled by the law firm of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher and Flom LLP. They received materials from Panel members, TriData, and their own staff members who provided legal advice to the Panel. Housed in 17 oversized boxes, Skadden mailed these files to the Office of the Governor in December 2007. These records, and an additional four boxes of records created by the Kaine administration, remained in the custody of the Governor's Office until January 2014 when they were transferred to the Library of Virginia. One CD of electronic records listed in the Skadden inventory was missing when the records arrived at the Library.

Gordon Davies donated additional records to the Library of Virginia on 15 September 2017. These records were added to Gordon Davies's papers in Series I.A. Records of Gordon Davies.

Processing Information

A box index, created by Skadden, was included in the transfer. The processing archivist re-boxed these records but retained the original order when possible.

The email files from the Virginia Tech Review Panel (including TriData and Skadden) were included with the paper records transfer to the Library in 2014. The email consisted of Microsoft Outlook files and text files and was stored on five cds. The files were loaded on the Library's secure dark archive and replicated on an off-site server. The email files were also loaded on to the processing server accessible to the processing archivists. All processing was done from the copied files on the processing server. Prior to processing, the governors' records archivist compiled an inventory of each email pst file. The processing archivist noted the file name, name and title of box owner, date range, file size in KB and total number of email files. This information was categorized by office. Gerald Massengill's email consisted of txt files. These were converted to PDFs for processing.

Historical Information

On 16 April 2007, Seung Hui Cho killed 32 people and injured at least 17 others before turning the gun on himself. The massacre at Virginia Tech is one of the deadliest shooting incidents by a single gunman in United States history. At the time of the shooting, Governor Tim Kaine had just arrived in Tokyo, Japan, for a trade mission. Kaine immediately returned to Virginia to deliver the convocation at Virginia Tech the next day. On 19 April 2007, Kaine commissioned the Virginia Tech Review Panel "to conduct an independent, thorough, and objective incident review of the tragedy at Virginia Tech and to make recommendations regarding improvements that can be made in the Commonwealth's laws, policies, procedures, systems and institutions, as well as those of other governmental entities and private providers." The members of the panel were:

Panel Chair Col. Gerald Massengill, a retired Virginia State Police Superintendent who led the Commonwealth's law enforcement response to the 11 September 2001, attack on the Pentagon and the sniper attacks that affected the Commonwealth in 2002.

Panel Vice Chair Dr. Marcus L. Martin, Professor of Emergency Medicine, Assistant Dean of the School of Medicine and Associate Vice President for Diversity and Equity at the University of Virginia.

Gordon Davies, former Director of the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (1977-1997) and President of the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education (1998-2002).

Dr. Roger L. Depue, a 20-year veteran of the FBI and the founder, past president and CEO of The Academy Group, Inc., a forensic behavioral sciences services company providing consultation, research, and investigation of aberrant and violent behavioral problems.

Carroll Ann Ellis, MS, Director of the Fairfax County Police Department's Victim Services Division, a faculty member at the National Victim Academy, and a member of the American Society of Victimology.

The Honorable Tom Ridge, former Governor of Pennsylvania (1995-2001) and Member of the U.S. House of Representatives (1983-1995) who was also the first U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security (2003-2005).

Dr. Aradhana A. "Bela" Sood, Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, Chair of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Medical Director of the Virginia Treatment Center for Children at VCU Medical Center.

The Honorable Diane Strickland, former judge of the 23rd Judicial Circuit Court in Roanoke County (1989-2003) and co-chair of the Boyd-Graves Conference on issues surrounding involuntary mental commitment.

TriData, a division of System Planning Corporation, provided staff support for the Virginia Tech Review Panel. In April 2007, Col. Gerald Massengill, Chairman of the Virginia Tech Review Panel, requested that Governor Tim Kaine retain TriData on behalf of the Commonwealth to assist the panel in completing an independent analysis of the circumstances of the 16 April 2007 shooting at Virginia Tech. TriData provided research, staff support and logistics for the Panel. TriData assisted the panel in collecting, organizing, and analyzing relevant information needed to develop a detailed factually analysis of the shooting and provide recommendations to Governor Kaine. TriData also assisted with writing, editing, and compiling the panel's report to the governor.

TriData staff that assisted the Panel included: Philip Schaenman, panel staff director Hollis Stambaugh, panel staff deputy director Jim Kudla, panel public information officer Dr. Harold Cohen Darryl Sensenig Paul Flippin Teresa Copping Maria Argabright Shania Flagg Lucius Lamar III Rachel Merson and Jim Gray.

On 29 May 2007, the panel engaged the international law firm of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher and From LLP to provide legal advice on a pro bono basis. Virginia Attorney General Robert McDonnell recommended that Governor Kaine appoint a special counsel for the panel in order to avoid any potential conflict of interest.

The panel held four public meetings: on 10 May 2007 in Richmond, 21 May 2007 at Virginia Tech, 11 June 2007 at George Mason University in Fairfax, and 18 July 2007 at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. The panel held a closed session on 19 July 2007 in Charlottesville to consult with counsel and discuss confidential matters and records. The panel began writing their report in July with assistance and editing by TriData and Skadden.

The Report of the Virginia Tech Review Panel was released on 30 August 2007. It revealed deficiencies in the mental health care system, campus security and gun laws. The panel made more than 70 recommendations directed to colleges, universities, mental health providers, law enforcement officials, emergency service providers and law makers. The General Assembly passed legislation to reform mental health commitment laws and campus security policies. One major recommendation by the panel was defeated: requiring background checks for all firearms purchases at gun shows.

In April 2008, the commonwealth reached an $11 million financial settlement with 24 families of students and faculty who were killed or injured during the Virginia Tech shooting. The commonwealth agreed to provide monetary pay outs, medical care and information on the shooting in exchange for the families waiving their right to sue. Two families did not accept the settlement and filed a civil suit in 2009. The discovery of Cho's counseling center records in July 2009 as well as other concerns by family members about the panel's official timeline for 16 April 2007 lead to calls for the panel to reconvene. Kaine did not reconvene the panel but agreed to have the report revised to reflect new details that had surfaced since 2007. The first addendum was completed by TriData in November 2009. Additional corrections to the addendum were made in December 2009.

Scope and Content

The Virginia Tech Review Panel Records, 2007-2009 (bulk 2007), are organized into five series. Series have designated for Files of Virginia Tech Review Panel Members, Files of TriData, Files of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher and Flom LLP, Files of the Office of the Governor, and Freedom of Information Act Request. These records document Virginia's official investigation into the 16 April 2007 mass shooting at Virginia Tech.

Arrangement

This collection is arranged into the following series:

Series I. Files of Virginia Tech Review Panel Members, 2007-2009: Subseries A. Records of Gordon Davies, 2007-2009 Subseries B. Records of Dianne Strickland, 2007 Subseries C. Records of Carroll Ann Ellis, 2007 Subseries D. Records of Gerald Massengill, 2007. Series II. Files of TriData, a Division of System Planning Corporation, 2007: Subseries A. Drafts of Mass Shootings at Virginia Tech, April 16, 2007: Report of the Virginia Tech Review Panel presented to Governor Kaine, 2007 Subseries B. Confidential Seung Hui Cho Documents, 2007 (transmitted) Subseries C. Collected Documents Related to the Investigation, 2007. Series III. Files of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher and Flom LLP, 2007: Subseries A. General Files Subseries B. Files of Bradley Marcus, 2007 Subseries C. Files of Ian Erickson, 2007 Subseries D. Files of Mike Kelly, 2007 Subseries E. Files of Michael Tierney, 2007 Subseries F. Files of Amy Sabrin, 2007 Subseries G. Files of Rich Brusca, 2007 Subseries H. Files of Anne Kim, 2007. Series IV. Files of the Office of the Governor, 2007-2009. Series V. Freedom of Information Act Request, 2007.

Related Material

The Library of Virginia Email Project - Governor Tim Kaine Portal includes over 8,000 Virginia Tech-related emails from 17 Kaine administration staff members, including Tim Kaine, Larry Roberts, Mark Rubin, Marc Follmer and Kate Paris. Subjects of these emails include the creation, work, and report of the Virginia Tech Review Panel meetings and correspondence between Kaine administration officials and family members of those killed or injured during the shooting and implementation of the 2008 settlement agreement. Documents that fall under the category of attorney-client privilege, mediation and settlement discussions, and privacy-protected information such as medical records have all been restricted or redacted.

The Virginia Tech Review Panel Archived Web Site, 2007 was used by the Virginia Tech Review Panel to gather comments and to inform the public about scheduled meetings and other developments.

The Tragedy at Virginia Tech Web Archive Collection, 2007-2012 captures Virginia government websites related to the shooting at Virginia Tech on Monday, April 16, 2007. This collection includes audio excerpts from press conferences held on Tuesday, April 17, audio excerpts from the Convocation ceremony held on Tuesday, April 17, and a video stream of the entire Convocation. Also included is a list of the victims.

The Governor Tim Kaine Administration Web Archive Collection, 2006-2010 contains archived versions of websites for the Governor's Office, his initiative sites, and the sites of his cabinet secretaries. Also included are the related sites for the First Lady (Anne Holton), as well as the Lt. Governor (Bill Bolling), and Attorney General (Bob McDonnell and William C. Mims), two statewide officials elected in the same cycle as Governor Kaine.

Contents List

The Files of the Virginia Tech Review Panel Members series documents the work of individual members of the Panel. Series is arranged into four subseries. Subseries have been designated for: A. Records of Gordon Davies B. Records of Dianne Strickland C. Records of Carroll Ann Ellis and D. Records of Gerald Massengill. The series consists of agendas, agreements, correspondence, email, drafts, handouts, memorandum, notes, presentations, and reports. This collection includes health records, legal advice, and personal information that are restricted for 75 years by the Code of Virginia (Virginia Government Data Collection and Dissemination Practices Act, Virginia Public Records Act, Virginia Health Records Privacy Act). Restricted documents have been sealed but have not been removed from the collection.

Additional individual Panel member records can be found in Series II. Files of TriData, especially Subseries A. Drafts of Mass Shootings at Virginia Tech, April 16, 2007: Report of the Virginia Tech Review Panel presented to Governor Kaine, 2007, and Series III. Files of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher and Flom LLP, 2007, especially Subseries G. Files of Rich Brusca.

This subseries is further divided into: A.I. Virginia Tech Review Panel Records, 2007, and A.II. Personal Papers, 2007-2009.

Gordon Davies Virginia Tech Review Panel records are housed in one box. It also contains 412 number of emails. Gordon Davies was the former Director of the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (1977-1997) and President of the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education (1998-2002).

Paper records include: drafts of the Panel's reports with handwritten edits/notes and working files from Panel meetings including meeting notes.

Davies sent and receieved 412 emails between April and September 2007. There are seven confidential emails that are restricted from public access for 75 years per Code of Virginia 42.1-78. Restricted material includes privileged records (attorney-client communications and attorney work product). Davies' unrestricted email is accessible online.

Email subjects include: leak of panel report to the New York Times media stories on the shooting, work of the Panel, and release of Panel report panel meetings press inquiries writing of report and proposed interviews.

Notable email includes: Cho's "shooting story" written for a class in fiction writing email from Phil Schaenman to the panel, dated 13 June 2007, outlining preliminary report schedule and email thread dated 29-30 August 2007 on the leak of the final report to the New York Times and the Governor's Office decision to post it online.

Email correspondents include: Teresa Copping, Roger Depue, Carroll Ann Ellis, Jim Kudla, Bill Leighty, Marcus Martin, Gerald Massengill, Lenwood McCoy, Phil Schaenman, Amy Sabrin, Bela Sood, Hollis Stambaugh, and Diane Strickland.

Gordon Davies personal papers are housed in three boxes. Gordon Davies was the former Director of the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (1977-1997) and President of the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education (1998-2002).

Davies' personal papers contain some Virginia Tech Review Panel records including legal advice to the panel, meeing notes, copy of the final report, and newspaper clippings. The meeting notes are not clearly identified. Some of the dates suggest they are Panel meeting notes. Others may be interview notes. The remainder of Davies personal papers contain records from conference meetings (agendas, presenations, and prepared remarks) he attended and articles he wrote about the Virginia Tech shooting. Restricted material (attorney-client communications and attorney work product) are restricted from public access for 75 years per Code of Virginia 42.1-78.

This subseries is housed in three boxes. It also contains 256 emails that can be accessed online. Diane Strickland was a former judge of the 23rd Judicial Circuit Court in Roanoke County (1989-2003) and co-chair of the Boyd-Graves Conference on issues surrounding involuntary mental commitment.

Paper records include: Seung-Hui Cho's health records from Virginia Tech's Schiffert Health Center and Cook Counseling Center Seung-Hui Cho's education records from Virginia Tech that includes admission information, university transcript, emails between members of English Department about Cho as well as examples of his writing assignments Seung-Hui Cho's education records from the Fairfax County Public Schools Seung-Hui Cho's medical records from Carilion New River Valley Medical Center and Carilion Saint Alban's Behavioral Health outline and drafts of the Virginia Tech Review Panel report and "Fatal School Shootings in the United States, 1966-2007," prepared by Skadden in 2007. Restricted documents have been sealed but have not been removed from the collection.

Strickland sent and receieved 256 emails between April and September 2007. There are 13 confidential emails that are restricted from public access for 75 years per Code of Virginia 42.1-78. Restricted material includes privileged records (attorney-client communications and attorney work product). Strickland's unrestricted email is accessible online.

Email subjects include: campus gun policies Cho's mental health history, including drafts of chapter, "Mental Health History of Seung Hui Cho" Cho's student writings from Professor Robert Hickock's class gun control Panel meetings writing of report, including concerns about reviewing drafts and finishing work by 23 August 2007 and interviews (proposed lists and notes).

Notable email includes: email thread between Roger Depue and Bela Sood, dated 22-23 August 2007, detailing their differences of opinion about Cho's mental health email from Lenwood McCoy, dated 26 August 2007, to Diane Strickland transmitting Cho's story from Professor Robert Hickock's class two emails from John Eide, dated 17 July 2007, containing Facebook messages Eide received from Cho in the fall of 2006 and email from Hollis Stambaugh, dated 11 June 2007, to the panel forwarding a letter from John Hammaren, father of Caitlin Hammaren.

Email correspondents include: Richard Bonnie, Richard Brusca, Gordon Davies, Roger Depue, Carroll Ann Ellis, Jim Kudla, Marcus Martin, Gerald Massengill, Lenwood McCoy, Phil Schaenman, Amy Sabrin, Bela Sood, and Hollis Stambaugh,

This subseries contains 226 emails sent and received by Carroll Ann Ellis between April and September 2007 that can be accessed online. Ellis was the Director of the Fairfax County Police Department's Victim Services Division, a faculty member at the National Victim Academy, and a member of the American Society of Victimology. There are 13 confidential emails that are restricted from public access for 75 years per Code of Virginia 42.1-78. Restricted material includes privileged records (attorney-client communications and attorney work product). Ellis' unrestricted email is accessible online.

Email subjects include: media stories on the shooting, work of the Panel, and release of Panel report Panel meetings writing of report, including concerns about reviewing drafts and finishing work by 23 August 2007 and interviews (proposed lists and notes).

Notable email includes: email from Gerald Massengill, dated 9 July 2007, to Roger Depue and Phil Schaenman, on law enforcement response at Virginia Tech email from Gordon Davies, dated 1 July 2007, to panel and Phil Schaenman and Hollis Stambaugh, sharing his thoughts on how to frame the Panel's report email from Daryl Sensenig, dated 29 May 2007, to Ellis, containing notes from 25 May 2007 interview of Dr. Marcella Fierro, Virginia State Medical Examiner email from Hollis Stambaugh, dated 11 June 2007, to the Panel forwarding a letter from John Hammaren, father of Caitlin Hammaren and email from Phil Schaenman, dated 27 June 2007, to Panel containing a first draft of a comprehensive outline for the Panel report including assignments for Panel members.

Email correspondents include: Richard Brusca, Teresa Coping, Gordon Davies, Roger Depue, Jim Kudla, Marcus Martin, Gerald Massengill, Lenwood McCoy, Phil Schaenman, Amy Sabrin, Bela Sood, Hollis Stambaugh, and Diane Strickland.

This subseries contains 105 emails send and received by Gerald Massengill between April and September 2007 that can be accessed online. Massengill, Panel Chair, was a retired Virginia State Police Superintendent who led the Commonwealth's law enforcement response to the 11 September 2001, attack on the Pentagon and the sniper attacks that affected the Commonwealth in 2002. There is one confidential email that is restricted from public access for 75 years per Code of Virginia 42.1-78. Restricted material includes privileged records (attorney-client communications and attorney work product). Massengill's unrestricted email is accessible online.

Email subjects include: media stories on the shooting, work of the Panel, and release of Panel report interviews by Panel member and staff and media interviews.

Notable email includes: email from Roger Depue, dated 18 June 2007, to Massengill sharing a contact Depue had with Eric and Beth Hilshire, parents of Emily Hilshire email exchange with Roger Depue, dated 11-12 August 2007, in which he discusses his review of Cho's writings at State Police Headquarters in Salem and his discussion with the Special Agent Chuck Eaton email from Massengill, dated 28 August 2007, to Phil Schaenman, relaying his conversation with Virginia Tech Police Chief Wendell Flinchum regarding bomb threats on campus email from Massengill, dated 6 July 2007, to Hollis Stambaugh, Richard Brusca, and Phil Schaenman, about Cho's gun purchases and email exchange between Massengill and Schaenman, dated 23 August 2007, about Cho's cell phone records.

Email correspondents include: Roger Depue, Jim Kudla, Larry Roberts, Phil Schaenman, and Hollis Stambaugh.

The Files of TriData series documents the collection of materials for and the writing and editing of the Panel's report to Governor Kaine. Series is arranged into three subseries. Subseries have been designated for: A. Drafts of Mass Shootings at Virginia Tech, April 16, 2007: Report of the Virginia Tech Review Panel presented to Governor Kaine, 2007 B. Confidential Seung Hui Cho Documents, 2007 C. Collected Documents Related to the Investigation, 2007. This collection includes health records, legal advice, and personal information that are restricted for 75 years by the Code of Virginia (Virginia Government Data Collection and Dissemination Practices Act, Virginia Public Records Act, Virginia Health Records Privacy Act). Restricted documents have been sealed but have not been removed from the collection.

TriData, a division of Arlington based System Planning Corporation, provided staff support for the Virginia Tech Review Panel. In April 2007, Col. Gerald Massengill, Chairman of the Virginia Tech Review Panel, requested that Governor Tim Kaine on behalf of the Commonwealth retain TriData to assist the Panel in completing an independent analysis of the circumstances of the 16 April 2007 shooting at Virginia Tech. TriData provided research, staff support and logistics for the Panel. TriData assisted the Panel in collecting, organizing, and analyzing relevant information needed to develop a detailed factually analysis of the shooting, and the preparation of the Panel's report and recommendations to Governor Kaine.

In August 2009, Governor Kaine retained TriData again to correct errors and update the original report. The Addendum was released in November 2009 and revised in December 2009.

TriData staff that assisted the Panel included: Philip Schaenman, panel staff director Hollis Stambaugh, panel staff deputy director Jim Kudla, panel public information officer Dr. Harold Cohen Darryl Sensenig Paul Flippin Teresa Copping Maria Argabright Shania Flagg Lucius Lamar III Rachel Merson and Jim Gray.

This subseries contains multiple drafts of chapters of the Virginia Tech Panel's final report to Governor Kaine. The records include comments and edits by members of the Virginia Tech Review Panel, TriData, and Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher and Flom LLP, the law firm advising the panel. Some but not all drafts are dated and indicate the person who made the comments/edits. Some drafts indicate the date when the edits/comments were added to the documents by TriData staff (usually by Shania Flagg). The chapter numbers and titles changed during the writing of the report and may not necessarily correspond to the chapters in the final report. This subseries contains attorney-client privileged records. Restricted documents have been sealed but have not been removed from the collection.

This subseries contains confidential documents about Seung Hui Cho including his educational records, medical records, 2005 commitment hearing and autopsy report. Cho's family gave written consent to Virginia Tech and the Fairfax County Public Schools for those entities to release education and medical records to the Virginia Tech Review Panel. The disclosures were made to the Panel that the records would not be disclosed to third parties or the public. This subseries includes health records and personal information that is restricted for 75 years by the Code of Virginia (Virginia Government Data Collection and Dissemination Practices Act, Virginia Public Records Act, and Virginia Health Records Privacy Act). Restricted documents have been sealed but have not been removed from the collection.

This series contains records related to the work of the Virginia Tech Review Panel. Included are correspondence from the general public (mailed and submitted through Panel's web page), newspaper clippings, correspondence from the general public (submitted through the Office of the Governor's web page), email correspondence from Department of Health employees between 16-24 April 2007 reference files and files of TriData staff members including: Philip Schaenman, President, TriData and Virginia Tech Review Panel staff director, Hollis Stambaugh, Jim Kudla, Maria Argabright, Shania Flagg, and Teresa Copping. Copping's files appear to be copies of records from other parts of the collection. This subseries includes legal advice, health records, and personal information that is restricted for 75 years by the Code of Virginia (Virginia Government Data Collection and Dissemination Practices Act, Virginia Public Records Act, Virginia Health Records Privacy Act). Restricted documents have been sealed but have not been removed from the collection.

Notable paper documents include: Office of the Inspector General for Mental Health, Mental Retardation and Substance Abuse Services, Investigation of April 16, 2007 Critical Incident at Virginia Tech OIG Report 140-07 (Preliminary Report, 2007 (b11, f1) List of suggested questions to ask when interviewing Seung-Hui Cho's family, (b11, f18) After Action Review, Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Virginia Tech Shootings Notes from interview with Dr. Marcella Fierro, Chief Medical Examiner, conducted by Carroll Ann Ellis (VTRP) and Darryl Sensenig (TriData) on 25 May 2007 (b12, f9 and b17, f1) copies of emails from employees of the Virginia Department of Health documenting their response to the shooting (b13-b14) and Memorandum to James A. Hyatt, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Virginia Tech, dated 4 June 2007, from Larry Hincker, Associate Vice President for University Relations, Communications related to April 16 (b15, f3).

The files of Philip Schaenman, President, TriData and Virginia Tech Review Panel staff director contains panel meeting notes, notes from meetings with officials at Virginia Tech and EMS, reference material, and drafts of the report. Notable records include: Schaeman's handwritten notes from meetings of the Virginia Tech Review Panel (b16, f4) and interview notes from 20 July 2007 with Cho's parents (b17, f8).

The files of Hollis Stambaugh, Virginia Tech Review Panel deputy director, contains 664 emails sent and received between April and September 2007. This content can be accessed online. There are 24 confidential emails that are restricted from public access for 75 years per Code of Virginia 42.1-78. Restricted material includes privileged records (attorney-client communications and attorney work product). Stambaugh's unrestricted email is accessible online.

Email subjects include: gathering information about Cho comments submitted to the Panel via the Virginia Tech Review Panel website Panel meetings news articles and interviews (lists and notes).

Notable email includes: email from Phil Schaenman, dated 25 June 2007, to Hollis Stambaugh forwarding an email from Andrew Goddard about the Colin Goddard and Emily Haas 911 phone call email from Hollis Stambaugh, dated 13 July 2007, to Roger Depue and Bela Sood, describing her attempt to get Cho's records from the Multicultural Center for Human Services email from Carroll Ann Ellis, dated 3 August 2007, to Daryl Sensenig, Hollis Stambaugh, and Phil Schaenman, transmitting memo from Dr. Marcella Fierro, Virginia State Medical Examiner email thread between Hollis Stambaugh and Phil Schaenman, dated 23, 26 July 2007 in which Stambaugh describes a phone call with Virginia Tech Police Chief Wendell Flinchum email thread between Hollis Stambaugh and Wade Smith, dated 5, 7 August 2007, requesting information about Cho's credit card bill email from Bela Sood, dated 21 July 2007, to Diane Strickland containing a document with Cho's Facebook messages email from Diane Strickland, dated 21 July 2007, to Bela Sood and Hollis Stambaugh, transmitting notes of interviews with Niki Giovanni, Professor of English at Virginia Tech (9 July 2007) and Ray Crouse, Independent Examiner (12 July 2007) email from Diane Strickland, dated 10 July 2007, to Bela Sood and Hollis Stambaugh, transmitting note from interview of Carl Bean, Cho's technical writing professor in the spring of 2006 (9 July 2007) email from Diane Strickland, dated 26 July 2007, to Bela Sood and Hollis Stambaugh, transmitting notes from interview with Maggie Bowman a VT student who interacted with Cho (26 July 2007) email from Diane Strickland, dated 23 July 2007, to Bela Sood and Hollis Stambaugh, transmitting notes from interview with Mike Turner, Clinical Support Representative, Carilion St. Albans (23 July 2007) email from Roger Depue, dated 8 July 2007, to Hollis Stambaugh transmitting his suggested interview questions for Cho's family Email from Hollis Stambaugh, dated 11 June 2007, to Virginia Tech Review Panel, transmitting a letter from John W. Hammaren, father of Caitlin email from Gordon Davies, dated 11 July 2007, to Diane Strickland, transmitting notes from interview with Melissa Trotman, Cho's Resident Advisor in 2005-06 email from Diane Strickland, dated 7 July 2007, to Gordon Davies, transmitting notes from interviews with Joseph Aust, Cho's roommate in 2006-07, and Austin Morton, Cho's RA in 2006-07 two emails from John Eide, dated 17 July 2007, containing Facebook messages Eide received from Cho in the fall of 2006 and email from Daryl Sensenig, dated 29 May 2007, to Ellis, containing notes from 25 May 2007 interview of Dr. Marcella Fierro, Virginia State Medical Examiner.

Email correspondents include: Gordon Davies, Roger Depue, Carroll Ann Ellis, Jim Kudla, Gerald Massengill, Lenwood McCoy, Amy Sabrin, Phil Schaenman, Bela Sood, Diane Strickland, and Tracy Tisbo.

The files of Jim Kudla, System Planning Corporation, Vice President, Communications and Information Solutions, and Virginia Tech Review Panel information officer, contain 778 emails sent and received between April and September 2007. Kudla's email is accessible online.

Email subjects include: news articles comments on chapter drafts media inquiries Panel meetings writing of report Panel access to material Cho mailed to NBC and press advisories and releases.

Notable email includes: email thread dated 29-30 August 2007 on the leak of the final report to the New York Times and the Governor's Office decision to post it online email thread between Panel members and Phil Schaenman, dated 7 August 2007 expressing concerns about the editing of the report and email from Phil Schaenman, dated 29 August 2007, to Jim Kudla, discussing who had access to report prior to leak to New York Times.

Email correspondents include: Teresa Copping, Tim Craig, Gordon Davies, Carroll Ann Ellis, Kevin Hall, Larry Hincker, Ben Huson, Marcus Martin, Gerald Massengill, Bill McKelway, Larry Roberts, Amy Sabrin, Phil Schaenman, Delacey Skinner, Bela Sood, and Hollis Stambaugh.

The files of Teresa Copping, executive assistant, TriData, include multiple drafts of chapters and the Virginia Tech Panel's final report to Governor Kaine, and 208 email. The chapter drafts contain notes that may have been written by Phil Schaenman. Copping may have used these notes to update chapter drafts on behalf of the Panel. Restricted documents have been sealed but have not been removed from the collection.

Copping sent and receieved 208 emails between May and September 2007 that can be accessed online. There is one confidential email that is restricted from public access for 75 years per Code of Virginia 42.1-78. Restricted material includes privileged records (attorney-client communications and attorney work product). Copping's unrestricted email is accessible online.

Email subjects include: news articles panel meetings (agendas and presentations) and lists of interviews conducted by panel.

Notable email includes: email from Copping, dated 1 August 2007, to Phil Schaenman transmitting Bela Sood's notes on Cho's history including interview notes with Cho's parents email from Copping, dated 1 August 2007, to Phil Schaenman transmitting interview notes with Cook Counseling Center and Care team staff email from Copping, dated 1 August 2007, transmitting transcript of Bela Sood's presentation to open panel on 18 July 2007 and email from John Hammaren, father of Caitlin Hammaren, dated 11 June 2007, to Teresa Copping transmitting Hammaren's comments to Panel.

Email correspondents include: Carroll Ann Ellis, Jim Kudla, Lenwood McCoy, Phil Schaenman, Bela Sood, and Hollis Stambaugh.

The files of Maria Argabright, executive assistant, TriData, contain 29 emails sent and received between July and August 2007. Argabright's email is accessible online.

Email subjects include: information compiled for the report (list of interviews, photographs).

Email correspondents include: Phil Schaenman and Hollis Stambaugh.

The files of Shania Flagg, TriData, contain 87 emails sent and received between April and August 2007. Flagg's email is accessible online.

Email subjects include: Panel correspondence and Virginia Tech Panel website.

Email correspondents include: Ben Huson, Gerald Massengill and Hollis Stambaugh.

The Files of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher and Flom LLP series documents the legal advice provided to the Virginia Tech Review Panel and TriData as well as the firm's comments and edits of the Panel's report to Governor Kaine. Series is arranged into eight subseries. Subseries have been designated for: A. General Files Subseries B. Files of Bradley Marcus Subseries C. Files of Ian Erickson Subseries D. Files of Mike Kelly Subseries E. Files of Michael Tierney Subseries F. Files of Amy Sabrin Subseries G. Files of Rich Brusca and Subseries H. Files of Anne Kim. This series includes health records, legal advice, and personal information that are restricted for 75 years by the Code of Virginia (Virginia Government Data Collection and Dissemination Practices Act, Virginia Public Records Act, Virginia Health Records Privacy Act). The majority of this series is restricted (attorney-client privilege and/or attorney work product).

On 29 May 2007, The Virginia Tech Review Panel engaged the international law firm of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher and Flom LLP to provide legal advice to the Panel on a pro bono basis. Governor Tim Kaine, in consultation with Attorney General Robert McDonnell, agreed to retain outside counsel for the Panel in order to avoid any potential conflict of interest. Litigation partners Richard Brusca and Amy Sabrin were the two lead attorneys for the Panel with assistance from other partners and lawyers in Skadden's Washington, D.C. office.

Skadden provided legal advice on a variety of subjects: record keeping under the Virginia Public Records Act and Virginia Data Collection and Dissemination Practices Act Public access to meetings and documents under the Virginia Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Clery Act and information on privacy laws (law enforcement records, court records, medical information and records, and education records).

This subseries contains correspondence, news articles, and legal documents. This subseries includes legal advice that is restricted for 75 years per Code of Virginia 42.1-78.

Arranged chronologically, the correspondence consists of printouts of emails and attachments sent and received by Skadden staff members. Also included are memorandums and legal opinions. These records contain attorney-client communications and attorney work products and are restricted from public access for 75 years per Code of Virginia 42.1-78. Box 22 is restricted.

Records consist of printouts of news articles related to the Virginia Tech shooting and the work of the Panel. Box 23 is unrestricted.

The majority of this material contains attorney-client communications and attorney work products and is restricted from public access for 75 years per Code of Virginia 42.1-78. For box 24, restricted documents have been sealed but have not been removed from the collection. Box 25 is restricted.

This subseries documents the work that Skadden attorney Bradley Marcus did for the Panel. Included are working papers, notes, legal advice, and email. This subseries contains attorney-client communications and attorney work product and is restricted (boxes 26 and 27) from public access for 75 years per Code of Virginia 42.1-78.

Marcus sent and received 410 emails between May and September 2007. There are 188 confidential emails that are restricted from public access for 75 years per Code of Virginia 42.1-78. Restricted material includes privileged records (attorney-client communications and attorney work product). Marcus's unrestricted email is accessible online.

Email subjects include: news updates and legal research conducted for Panel.

Notable email includes: email thread by Panel members, dated 24-25 June 2007, detailing the need for the Panel to meet privately and exchange information and views.

Email correspondents include: Richard Brusca, Ian Erickson, Anne Kim, Tannia Nazelrod, Lauren Regan, Larry Roberts, Amy Sabrin, Hollis Stambaugh and Michael Tierney.

This subseries documents the work of Skadden attorney Ian Erickson did for the Panel. Included are memorandums, legal advice, and email. This subseries contains attorney-client communications and attorney work product and is restricted (boxes 27 and 28) from public access for 75 years per Code of Virginia 42.1-78.

Erickson sent and received 364 emails between May and August 2007. There are 164 confidential emails that are restricted from public access for 75 years per Code of Virginia 42.1-78. Restricted material includes privileged records (attorney-client communications and attorney work product). Erickson's unrestricted email is accessible online.

Email subjects include: news updates and legal research conducted for Panel.

Notable email includes: email from Diane Strickland, dated 19 June 2007, to Amy Sabrin documenting problems getting Cho's records from Cook Counsel Center email from Any Sabrin, dated 23 August 2007, to Panel members and staff detailing her comments on the Executive Summary of the Panel report and email thread by Panel members, dated 24-25 June 2007, detailing the need for the Panel to meet privately and exchange information and views.

Email correspondents include: Richard Brusca, Jim Kudla, Bradley Marcus, Larry Roberts, Amy Sabrin, Phil Schaenman, Hollis Stambaugh and Michael Tierney.

This subseries documents the work of Skadden attorney Mike Kelly did for the Panel. Included are correspondence, newspaper articles and legal advice. This subseries contains attorney-client communications and attorney work product and is restricted (box 29) from public access for 75 years per Code of Virginia 42.1-78.

This subseries documents the work of Skadden attorney Michael Tierney did for the Panel. Included are handwritten meeting and telephone call notes, memorandums, and email. This subseries contains attorney-client communications and attorney work product and is restricted (boxes 29-30) from public access for 75 years per Code of Virginia 42.1-78.

Tierney sent and received 485 emails between May and September 2007. There are 67 confidential emails that are restricted from public access for 75 years per Code of Virginia 42.1-78. Restricted material includes privileged records (attorney-client communications and attorney work product). Tierney's unrestricted email is available online.

Email subjects include: news updates legal research conducted for panel comments on chapter drafts and collection of Panel records.

Notable email includes: email thread by Panel members and staff, dated 17 August 2007, discussing the status of report and the need for more time email from Amy Sabrin, dated 14 August 2007, to Skadden attorneys forwarding email from Wendell Flinchum addressing the Virginia Tech police department's authority to disseminate warnings.

Email correspondents include: Richard Brusca, Gordon Davies, Anne Kim, Jim Kudla, Marcus Martin, Gerald Massengill, Lauren Regan, Amy Sabrin, Phil Schaenman, Bela Sood, Hollis Stambaugh and Diane Strickland.

This subseries documents the work of Skadden attorney Amy Sabrin did for the Panel. Included are correspondence, memorandums, chapter drafts of Panel report, and email. This subseries contains attorney-client communications and attorney work product and is restricted (boxes 31-32) from public access for 75 years per Code of Virginia 42.1-78.

Sabrin sent and received 798 emails between July and October 2007. There are 122 confidential emails that are restricted from public access for 75 years per Code of Virginia 42.1-78. Restricted material includes privileged records (attorney-client communications and attorney work product). Sabrin's unrestricted email is accessible online.

Subjects include: contacting Cho's family engagement of Skadden as counsel for the Panel news articles legal research conducted for Panel comments on chapter drafts collection of Panel records writing of report and Panel meetings.

Notable email includes: email thread dated 29-30 August 2007 on the leak of the final report to the New York Times and the Governor's Office decision to post it online email thread between Roger Depue and Bela Sood, dated 22-23 August 2007, detailing their differences of opinion about Cho's mental health email from Bela Sood, dated 10 August 2007, to Panel expressing her concerns about the final review draft of the report and requesting a delay in release of report to 30 August email from Michael Tierney, dated 29 June 2007, to Richard Brusca and Amy Sabrin, containing notes of telephone conversation with Roanoke Firearms related to Cho's purchase of 9mm Glock 19 email from Diane Strickland, dated 19 June 2007, to Amy Sabrin documenting problems getting Cho's records from Cook Counsel Center email from Any Sabrin, dated 23 August 2007, to Panel members and staff detailing her comments on the Executive Summary of the Panel report email thread between Panel members, dated 15 August 2007, on gun control and email thread between Panel members, staff, and attorneys, dated 27 June 2007, on the need to meet to discuss various issues.

Correspondents include: Richard Brusca, Gordon Davies, Roger Depue, Carroll Ann Ellis, Ian Erickson, Anne Kim, Jim Kudla, Bradley Marcus, Marcus Martin, Gerald Massengill, Lauren Regan, Larry Roberts, Phil Schaenman, Wade Smith, Bela Sood, Hollis Stambaugh, Diane Strickland and Michael Tierney.

This subseries documents the work of Skadden attorney Rich Brusca did for the Panel. Included are correspondence, legal advice, memorandums, meeting materials, news articles, chapter drafts of Panel report, and email (printed). The majority of this series is restricted (attorney-client privilege and/or attorney work product). Boxes, 36, 36A, 38 and 39 are restricted. Boxes 34 and 37 are unrestricted. Boxes 33, 35, 35A, 35B are open restricted documents have been sealed but have not been removed from the box.

Notable documents include: Virginia Tech Review Panel Report, Tentative Outline, indicating proposed authors for each section of report, 25 June 2007 (b33, f8) printed email between Panel members, TriData, Skadden, and the governor's office, 25 May to 11 September 2007 (b35, f2 to b35A). Email includes discussions about draft chapters of report and release of report.

The files of Anne Kim, Skadden, contain 109 emails sent and received between July and October 2007. There is one confidential email that is restricted from public access for 75 years per Code of Virginia 42.1-78. Restricted material includes privileged records (attorney-client communications and attorney work product). Kim's unrestricted email is accessible online.

Email subjects include: news articles and comments on chapter drafts.

Email correspondents include: Richard Brusca, Neil Canfield, Amy Sabrin and Michael Tierney.

The Files of the Office of the Governor series primarily document the implementation of the settlement agreements between the Commonwealth and the families and the revision of the Panel report by TriData in 2009. The majority of these records appear to be from Marc Follmer. Follmer was Deputy Director, Department of General Services (January 2006-2007), Deputy Assistant to the Governor, Office of Commonwealth Preparedness (2007-2009) and Senior Advisor to the Governor (2009-January 2010). He also was a member of the Virginia Tech Working Group, a group of Kaine administration officials tasked to address all issues related to the aftermath of the shooting and assisted in implementing the settlement agreements. Additional records related to the Virginia Tech Working Group, the settlement agreements, and the revision of the Panel report can be found in the Kaine administration email collection.

In April 2008, the Commonwealth reached an $11 million financial settlement with 24 families of students and faculty who were killed or injured during the Virginia Tech shooting. The Commonwealth agreed to provide monetary pay outs, medical care and information on the shooting in exchange for the families to waive their rights to sue. Funds created by the settlement include: Direct Payments to Claimants, Special Damages Fund-Medical Reimbursements, Special Damages Fund-Health Insurance Fund, Public Purpose Funds-Charitable Purposes Fund, and Public Purpose Funds-Hardship Fund. Two families who filed claims against the state did not accept the settlement and filed a civil suit in 2009. The discovery of Cho's Cook Counseling Center records in July 2009 and other concerns by family members about the Panel's timeline for 16 April 2007, lead to calls for the Panel to reconvene. Kaine did not reconvene the Panel but agreed to have the report revised to reflect the new details that surfaced since 2007. Governor Kaine asked the victims' families and Virginia Tech to submit any corrections or additions they thought important by the end of August 2009. The time was extended into September after the discovery of Cho's missing Cook Counseling Center records. The first addendum was completed by TriData in November 2009. Additional corrections to the addendum were made in December 2009.

Notable documents include: background and credentials of TriData including a copy of their 2003 assessment of Virginia's response to Hurricane Isabel (b54, f1) memorandum from Larry Roberts, Counselor to the Governor, to Governor Kaine and Chief of Staff Bill Leighty, dated 19 April 2007, providing his thoughts on how to structure the independent commission to review the shootings at Virginia Tech (b54, f2) 26 April 2007 letter retaining TriData, division of System Planning Corporation to assist the Virginia Tech Review Panel (b54, f2) copy of letter, dated 1 June 2007, appointing Skadden Arps Slate Meagher and Flom LLP as special counsel to the Virginia Tech Review Panel (b54, f2) letter from Mark Rubin, Counselor to the Governor, to Philip Schaenman, President of TriData, dated 17 August 2009, retaining the firm to revise and make corrections to the 2007 Virginia Tech Review Panel report (b54, f2) copy of settlement agreement, June 2008 (b54, f4) charts describing the name, purpose, and amounts of funds authorized under the Virginia Tech Settlement Agreement (b54, f9) Drafts of Memorandum (with supporting documentation) to Governor Kaine from Marc Follmer on Virginia Tech Outstanding Issues, March-May 2009 (b55, f4) Meeting with Governor Kaine and Virginia Tech Families, 26 September 2009 (b55, f11-12) Proposed Corrections to the Virginia Tech Panel Report, 2009 (b56, f9) Marc Follmer's notes from conference and telephone calls with Virginia Tech Review Panel members, staff from TriData and family members, September-November 2009 (b56, f10) Family Supplement to Addendum -"Forever in Our Hearts: Mass Shooting at Virginia Tech - Supplement to the Report of the Review Panel," December 2009 (b57, f3) and Virginia Tech Police Chief Wendell Flinchum's presentation to the Virginia Tech Families (b57, f5).


Inside classroom 211 at Virginia Tech: Ten years after the second deadliest school shooting in US history

DURING the second worst school massacre in US history, one class room felt the full force of a gun man. This is their story, 10 years on.

Cho Seung-hui recorded and then sent footage to a TV station in New York, during the period between his first and second lot of shootings at Virginia Tech. Source:AFP

IT WAS a usual Monday for 21-year-old Colin Goddard and his classmate Kristina Heeger on the morning of April 16, 2007.

Goodard, who had picked up Heeger on their way to a 9am French class in room 211 at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, had considered the notion of skipping class.

The fateful decision to attend that day would change his life forever.

“We were debating in the parking lot whether we skip and have breakfast or go,” Goddard told ABC News this week, 10 years on.

“It was close to the end of the year and we figured, you know, we should go.”

He arrived five minutes late to class that day, 25 minutes behind class mate Rachel Hill, who explained she was late due to a shooting in her dormitory that morning. Her building had been in lockdown and she had finally been allowed out. Less than 25 minutes later, Rachel would be one of the first to be shot dead, in her chair.

“She never made it to the floor,” said Goddard.

Little did they know at the time, Seung-Hui Cho, a mentally-ill student, was heading directly their way. By the end of this awful massacre, he would shoot 11 students in this classroom dead, as well as their Professor. Only six would walk out alive.

Rachael Hill. Hill, a freshman studying biology, was one of the students killed by the gunman at Virginia Tech. Source:News Limited

“That was the first time we𠆝 heard of it. There was no email, no alert, nothing,” Heeger would retell later.

Cho would terrorise victims in three other classrooms, one a German class, spraying students with bullets several times.

Those bullets were designed with a hollow-point, which unfurls “like flower petals” when it hits flesh, creating �vastating internal wounds”.

He would kill a total of 30 after the attack in Norris Hall and another two in a dorm room attack. All of this in just 11 minutes. His rampage remains the second deadliest shooting in US history. A massacre that claimed 49 lives at an Orlando, Florida, nightclub surpassed it last year.

Injured occupants are carried out of Norris Hall at Virginia Tech. Picture: Alan Kim Source:AP

Seung-Hui Cho, the student gunman who went on a shooting rampage at Virginia Tech on April 16, 2007, that left 33 dead, including himself. Source:AP

Kevin Sterne, pictured, was wounded so badly that paramedics had to resuscitate him on the floor of Norris Hall. Picture: Alan Kim Source:AP

As Cho made his way towards the class, the students began to hear a sound described only as �ngs”.

The students didn’t see any need for alarm — Virginia Tech had been undergoing construction and they thought the gun shots were noises from the work site.

But as they got louder, and closer, students began to get nervous.

“We all started looking at each other were like, ‘what was that?’,” Goddard said.

French teacher Professor Jocelyne Couture-Nowak peered outside the classroom door before slamming it shut.

“Get under the desks and call 911,” Goddard recalled his professor alerting the students.

Cho was attempting to enter the class room.

𠇏or the first time in my life, I called 911 from my phone and heard a woman’s voice and tried to explain to her that I thought there was someone at our school shooting a gun,” Goddard said.

𠇋y the time I got out where we were and which building and which floor, we had bullets coming through the door,” he revealed in 2010.

“The next 10 minutes was the longest 10 minutes of my life. It felt like hours. It was absolutely terrifying. Like nothing you can imagine on television or anything you’ve seen before. It was totally terrifying.”

“It was the most scared I’ve ever been in my life. I don’t remember having the thought of, ‘I’m going to die.’ All I can remember thinking was, ‘I just can’t believe that this is real’.

Meanwhile, Matthew La Porte, a 20-year-old political science major, was attempting to stop Cho from breaking in.

“Matthew was trying to secure the door so the shooter couldn’t come in,” Matthew’s mother, Barbara La Porte, said.

“He fell with his arms out stretched towards the door.”

Cho made his way through the barricaded doors. There was no time for the students. He walked in, went to the opposite side of the classroom, and began shooting.

Throughout the course of the massacre, he would enter classroom 211 multiple times, pointing his gun towards Goddard’s row of desks.

He was shot four times. It smelt like fireworks.

Heeger was shot twice in the back and once in her toe.

�ter that last shot to the right shoulder, you could hear the police on the scene,” Goddard said.

“I threw the phone, trying to act natural with the bullet. The phone stayed open and landed next to Emily’s head and she remained on the line with the dispatcher.”

One of the few photographs taken inside French class in Holden Hall at the time. Source:Supplied

Matthew Joseph La Porte, a member of the Regimental Band of Virginia Tech, was one of the people killed. Picture: Stevens Photography Source:AP

Emily Haas, meanwhile, was crouching for safety underneath her desk when Goddard took the fourth final shot to his shoulder.

Despite taking two near-bullets to the head and suffering grazes from the strikes, she picked up Goddard’s mobile phone and stayed on the line with emergency services.

“When the shooting was over, the 911 operator told me the police couldn’t get into my room, and asked if I could open the door,” Haas told ABC News.

�ter that, the police led me out of the building. I think one or two others were able to walk out of the room on their own, but the rest could not.”

First responders on the campus began to catalogue each victim through a series of colour codes yellow for serious, red for severe and black for non-viable.

“In a real disaster you take the people you can save first,” David Stoeckle, who served as chief of surgery at Montgomery Regional at the time, told the Chicago Tribune.

“You’ve got to save as many as possible.”

Roanoke Firearms store owner John Markell poses outside his shop in Roanoke, Virginia. Cho Seung-Hui bought a Glock 19 handgun from the shop 36 days before the shooting. Source:AFP

Classroom 211 was the last class to be attacked that day. It would be the same room where gunman Cho would end his own life, after firing 174 rounds.

Meanwhile, as the classroom massacre was unfolding, Bryan Cloud, an accounting professor at the same university, was in his office preparing for class when he heard of the shooting.

His daughter, Austin Cloyd, was in classroom 211.

Bryan and his wife, Renee, began frantically calling their daughter. She wasn’t answering.

Panicked, they headed to a nearby hotel where surviving students were being reunited with loved ones.

“We sort of hoped, ‘That’s where we’ll find Austin,’” Bryan told ABC.

“Somewhere in that foggy aftermath, we sort of began to lose hope.”

The next day, the worst was confirmed. Austin had been shot — and she didn’t survive.

“Your future kind of goes away when your kids go away,” he said.

“One of the good things that Renee and I decided pretty early on was that we were going to focus on trying to help the students at Tech heal by engaging them in the same sorts of service activities that Austin found meaningful.”

Jocelyn Couture-Nowak was a teacher at Virginia Tech. She lost her life that day. Source:News Limited

Austin Cloyd, 18, was among the students killed. Source:AP

Both Goddard and Haas would eventually graduate from Virginia Tech.

𠇎veryone thought I would transfer,” Goddard said.

“I started at Virginia Tech and I had to finish it there. I think it was also a sense of not wanting him [the shooter] to knock me off my path. The school was incredibly helpful afterwards and that’s where my friends were. My whole life was there.”

Virginia Tech held a series of events to mark the anniversary of the deadly campus shooting on April 16, 2007. Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe and US Senator Tim Kaine were among the 10,000 to 20,000 people on the Blacksburg campus for the solemn occasion.

Kaine, who was governor at the time of the shooting, said he still vividly remembers the horrors of that day, but has also grown close to many of the survivors and the victims’ families.

“We’re going with a lot of different emotions, but we wouldn’t be anywhere else,” said Kaine

In a speech Sunday afternoon, Kaine said April 16, 2007 remains “the worst day of my life.” Kaine had been governor for a year and a half when the shooting occurred, and said since that day he’s kept in touch with many families who lost children, spouses or loved ones in the mass shooting.

Kaine recalled speaking with families as he was leaving the governor’s mansion in 2010.

“I remember saying to them, I’ll never understand what you lost, because I never lost a child, a spouse, a parent or a sibling,” he said. 𠇋ut as somebody who has grown to know the biographies and stories of each of these 32, I begin to have a sense of what the Commonwealth lost, what the country lost, what the world lost on April 16, 2007.”


Virginia Tech Shooting: Shots Fired At Virginia Tech, At Least 2 Dead

A police officer and one other person were killed on the Virginia Tech campus on Thursday, according to university officials. The incident took place on the same campus where the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history occurred back in 2007.

In a statement posted on its website, the school reported that shortly after noon, a Virginia Tech police officer made a traffic stop. The officer was then shot and killed, according to witnesses.

During a press conference Thursday afternoon, authorities said the gunman was not believed to have been involved in the traffic stop.

The shooter fled on foot toward another parking lot, where a second body was later recovered.

At the press conference, school officials and law enforcement authorities declined to identify the second person found dead as the gunman. However a law enforcement source speaking on the condition of anonymity told The Associated Press that the second body is believed to be the remains of the suspect.

The suspect is described as a white male, wearing "gray sweat pants, gray hat w/neon green brim, maroon hoodie and backpack," according to a 12:47 p.m. tweet from the university's VT Alerts notification system.

Law enforcement from several agencies responded with Virginia state police taking the lead in the investigation.

Full statement from Virginia Tech below:

Police investigating shootings on campus shooter's status unknown (Posted: 1:49 p.m.) Shortly after noon today, a Virginia Tech police officer stopped a vehicle on campus during a routine traffic stop in the Coliseum parking lot near McComas Hall

During the traffic stop. the officer was shot and killed. There were witnesses to this shooting.

Witnesses reported to police the shooter fled on foot heading toward the Cage, a parking lot near Duck Pond Drive. At that parking lot, a second person was found. That person is also deceased.

Several law enforcement agencies have responded to assist. Virginia State Police has been requested to take lead in the investigation

The status of the shooter is unknown. The campus community should continue to shelter in place and visitors should not come to campus.

The AP adds that it was the first gunfire on campus since 33 people were killed in 2007.

The deaths came on the same day that Virginia Tech's police chief testified in DC about how the school handled the 2007 shooting. The university is facing charges of failure to issue a timely warning and failure to follow its own procedures for providing notification.

The campus was swarming Thursday with heavily armed officers walking around campus. Caravans of SWAT vehicles and other police cars with emergency lights flashing patrolled nearby. Students hunkered down in buildings.

"It's crazy that someone would go and do something like that with all the stuff that happened in 2007," said Corey Smith, a 19-year-old sophomore from Mechanicsville, Va., who was headed to a dining hall near the site of one of the shootings.

He told The Associated Press that he stayed inside after seeing the alerts from the school. "It's just weird to think about why someone would do something like this when the school's had so many problems," Smith said.

Thursday was a "study" day for Virginia Tech students in preparation for final exams, which were to begin Friday. Final exams have been postponed for now.


IamA Class of 2007 Virginia Tech Graduate that was on campus for the worst school shooting in American History that happened 10 years ago, AMA

My short bio: I was a senior about 7 weeks away from graduating when 4/16/2007 happened. I knew several people that were either killed or injured. There isn't a single week that goes by since that day when it doesn't cross my mind.

  • I was not in a classroom, and I was not shot. I was on my way to an unaffected class room.

  • I was good friends with one person that was killed, acquaintances with a few who were shot, and knew several others affected.

  • The top takeaways from the incident for me were:

  1. The media is an extremely sharpened double-edged sword. The same vehicle that generated a global outpouring of support also arm-chair quarterbacked their way into criticizing our school, and stalked students around campus trying to generate tears-on-camera. I was set to graduate with a degree in mass communication, but abondoned the media industry altogether after that incident.

  2. Virginia Tech is one of the most resilient, kindest communities I've ever known. Everyone parents asked us to "leave and come home," but not a single person I know did. We all stayed. Even the 20-or-so injured students all came back to school as soon as they could. Everyone wanted to be at school to help each other and not let something like this define who we were. One guy who was shot in the leg left his hospital bed against doctor's order on crutches, just so he could walk across stage at our departmental commencement ceremony. People gave him a full five minute standing ovation.

  3. I remember being rather hurt/upset that it can branded as "the Virginia Tech massacre." No one asked us (the students) if that was okay. I realize that's not historical labeling works, but it just always bothered me.

EDIT 2: The intent here was to simply give folks a personal perspective on how a school/community is impacted beyond what you may recall hearing from the media. I care about my school and wanted awareness for my 32 heroes to live on a decade later. Even though I created a throw-away account and remained anonymous, there are redditors here who somehow believe I'm doing this for personal attention(?). There are certainly accounts and stories to be told of those "closer" to the incident itself, but I never claimed to be one of those accounts, so I'm having trouble reconciling some of the outrage and hatred in the comments.

With that, I'm going to stop responding to things now. My sincerest apologies if any one found this exploitative or disrespectful, it certainly was never the intent.


Virginia Tech shooting worst in US history

At least 33 killed, including gunman, in separate incidents at two campus locations. University locked down campus after second incident.

America's debate over gun violence and school safety was sure to heat up again after the shooting rampage at Virginia Tech on Monday, in which at least 33 people died. It was the worst gun rampage in US history.

The killings happened at opposite ends of the Blacksburg campus: first, at about 7:15 a.m., in a dormitory, where at least two were killed and then, about two hours later and half a mile away, at a science and engineering building. More than two dozen people were also wounded in the attacks.

The gunman himself was found dead at the second shooting location. He was not carrying identification, and authorities had so far not been able to determine his identity.

Also still to be determined: a motive for the shootings.

After the morning rampage, the campus community, which includes more than 25,000 full-time students, tried to come to grips with what had happened.

"Today the university was struck with a tragedy that we consider of monumental proportions," said Virginia Tech President Charles Steger. "The university is shocked and indeed horrified."

After the shootings in the dormitory, that building was closed. But officials said they believed the incident was an isolated one, so they did not close the campus or order a lockdown. In addition, there were indications that the gunman had left the campus.

It was only after the second set of shootings that the campus was closed and went into lockdown mode.

With so many fatalities, some students questioned how the university had handled the incident.

"Two cops who were standing outside of McBryde [Hall] told everyone to start running, and we heard a couple gunshots and we started running, and we ran to the library, where we stayed for, like, 2-1/2 hours," Kostayne Link, an interdisciplinary studies major at Virginia Tech, told the Roanoke Times's online edition. "A lot of our friends live in [the dorm where shots were fired], and we heard that a girl got shot and killed in the stairwell…. So everyone was just talking about how they couldn't believe that they let students out at 7:45 to go to their 8 a.m. classes, because someone had just gotten shot and killed 30 minutes before."

Some students told CNN that in recent weeks, the university had received multiple bomb threats – two of which appeared to target the science and engineering school.

Still, the incident didn't have any indication of terrorism, according to a spokesman for the US Department of Homeland Security. Such issues, however, would be part of the investigation, the spokesman said.

At the scene, officials from the US Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives began collecting shell casings, authorities said, who added that history of the weapon used in the rampage would be traced.

President Bush responded to the incident by offering his prayers to those involved, said Dana Perino, a White House spokeswoman. "He was horrified, and his immediate reaction was one of deep concern for the families of the victims, the victims themselves, the students, the professors, and all of the people of Virginia who have dealt with this shocking incident," Ms. Perino said.

The spokeswoman also characterized Mr. Bush's views on the presence of guns in US society. "The president believes that there is a right for people to bear arms, but that all laws must be followed," Perino said.

Before Monday's incident, the worst US shooting rampage took place in 1991 in Killeen, Texas. There, in a cafeteria, George Hennard killed 23 people and shot himself.

The Virginia Tech campus stretches across 2,600 acres in the Blue Ridge Mountains, about 160 miles west of Richmond and about 240 miles southwest of Washington. The university's science and engineering school is regarded as a leading technical institute in the United States.

Material from Associated Press and Reuters was used in this report.


Watch the video: FIRST DAY OF COLLEGE VLOG. Virginia Tech